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 vegetarian diets & diabetes

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Pete
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PostSubject: vegetarian diets & diabetes   Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:50 pm

I stumbled across a few bits about the benefits of meat-free diets & diabetes:

Type of Vegetarian Diet, Body Weight, and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Basically vegan gives best results, then veggies, then various semi-vegan & finally meat eaters. There's a a BMI unit difference of 5 units between vegan & meat-eaters! The conclusion is interesting:


Quote :
CONCLUSIONS The 5-unit BMI difference between vegans and nonvegetarians indicates a substantial potential of vegetarianism to protect against obesity. Increased conformity to vegetarian diets protected against risk of type 2 diabetes after lifestyle characteristics and BMI were taken into account. Pesco- and semi-vegetarian diets afforded intermediate protection.

Vegetarian Dietary Patterns Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Metabolic Syndrome The Adventist Health Study 2 This one is vegetarian V semi-veg V meat eater. In this veggie was best, as noted in the conclusion:

In the quote below MRFs is metabolic risk factors & MetS is metabolic syndrome

Quote :
CONCLUSIONS A vegetarian dietary pattern is associated with a more favorable profile of MRFs and a lower risk of MetS. The relationship persists after adjusting for lifestyle and demographic factors.


A Low-Fat Vegan Diet Improves Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes I must admit I'm not a fan of low fat vegan diets for most athletes. They appear to work for interventions where obesity, type 2 diabetes & other metabolic syndrome type. Generally I've not found the best athletic or physique from low fat diets on already lean or fairly lean athletes, but that's purely anecdotal on my part, & it's also not to say that it doesn't work for some either. As a control measure for some medical conditions I'd say it fairly well proven as a method of recovery. As shown in this conclusion:

Quote :
CONCLUSIONS—Both a low-fat vegan diet and a diet based on ADA guidelines improved glycemic and lipid control in type 2 diabetic patients. These improvements were greater with a low-fat vegan diet.

A Plant-Based Diet for Type 2 Diabetes Scientific Support and Practical Strategies Another low fat vegan diet, again with successful outcomes:

Quote :
Conclusions

Plant-based meal planning is an acceptable and effective strategy that educators can use to improve diabetes management and reduce risk of complications. Studies show that dietary changes that are effective for reducing cardiac risk may also be helpful for management of type 2 diabetes. A low-fat, plant-based diet reduces body weight and improves glycemic control, and has been shown to be remarkably well accepted by patients.

Nutrition Concerns and Health Effects of Vegetarian Diets This one mentions the positive effects for type 2 diabetics, but also highlights some possible negatives we have to watch out for like low B12, omega-3 intake & vitamin D (many people need to worry about low vit D whatever their diet in my view). Here's the abstract:

Quote :
Vegetarians exhibit a wide diversity of dietary practices, often described by what is omitted from their diet. When a vegetarian diet is appropriately planned and includes fortified foods, it can be nutritionally adequate for adults and children and can promote health and lower the risk of major chronic diseases. The nutrients of concern in the diet of vegetarians include vitamin B12, vitamin D, ω-3 fatty acids, calcium, iron, and zinc. Although a vegetarian diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients, the use of supplements and fortified foods provides a useful shield against deficiency. A vegetarian diet usually provides a low intake of saturated fat and cholesterol and a high intake of dietary fiber and many health-promoting phytochemicals. This is achieved by an increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole-grains, legumes, nuts, and various soy products. As a result of these factors, vegetarians typically have lower body mass index, serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and blood pressure; reduced rates of death from ischemic heart disease; and decreased incidence of hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers than do nonvegetarians.

Vegetarian Diets and Diabetes Lists a lot of potential benefits for those with type 2 diabetes & metabolic syndrome:

Quote :
A large body of evidence suggests that vegetarian and plant-based diets provide exceptional health benefits, including a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and some types of cancer, and increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fat, particularly saturated fat, and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy protein, which together provide micro-nutrients and protective factors at higher levels than most Western diets. In observational studies, a vegetarian or vegan diet is associated with reduced risk of development of type 2 diabetes and lower risk of complications in those with existing diabetes. Although it is often difficult to separate vegetarianism from other healthy lifestyle behaviors, this eating pattern and the absence of red meat and processed meat products may provide particular benefits in the management of diabetes and prediabetes. This article critically reviews the scientific evidence for the role of vegetarian diets in the prevention and management of diabetes.

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PostSubject: Re: vegetarian diets & diabetes   Wed Apr 20, 2011 11:24 am

Stumbled on a new study just published that again shows you that a veggie diet is helpful at controlling type 2 diabetes, here's the abstract:

Vegetarian diet improves insulin resistance and oxidative stress markers more than conventional diet in subjects with Type 2 diabetes.

I would like to raise a couple of points here. First I'm not saying this is the ONLY way you can have a beneficial effect on type 2 diabetes. I'm sure simply cutting out refined sugar, flour & sticking to whole foods would help you somewhat as well as would several other protocols.

Secondly, many people are touting that carbs 'cause' type 2 diabetes. That is ANY carbs & so the only method that can control the condition is very low/zero carb diets. Obviously seeing all the above you can see that's obviously not true! Limiting refined carbs would be a great idea, as would cutting out refined sugar, but you do not need to cut out carbs, just make sensible choices. Eating a slice of whole grain bread (assuming you have no gluten issues) is a world apart from ingesting a refined white slice, in terms of insulin reaction, nutritional intake & the effect upon the body. Eating a sensible diet based around whole foods is the best approach to tackle conditions like these (obviously with the help & support of your medical practitioner). You don't want or need to follow stupidly unbalanced diets & take the overly-simplistic idea of cutting all carbs, it's an ill-considered over-reaction. Your goal should be to learn to make healthy choices.
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