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 Homoeopathy sceptics plan mass 'overdose'

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PostSubject: Homoeopathy sceptics plan mass 'overdose'   Sat Jan 23, 2010 9:52 am

Here's a bit from the independent newspaper about a group of people who are going to overdose of homoeopathic medicines. I've never really understood how it works myself...maybe it's never been explained properly to me (or maybe simply enough for me Shocked ).
From what I can gather the idea is that water has 'memory' of some kind & 'remembers' what was put in it. The trouble I have with that is what about everything that's already been put in it, certainly mineral salts from the sea must have left a 'memory', if it passed through an animal then it could well have a urine 'memory', if it became a plant or animal then a cell 'memory', the list goes on as water must have passed through many environments, so why wouldn't it 'remember' those? I suppose, there are 101 answers & I'm not saying it doesn't work, but that I don't understand why it works &why naturally diluted water , like that in rivers & seas doesn't have fabulous healing properties? There has been some research done & it is pretty overwhelmingly towards it not working, but I believe the people for it say these studies are not done accurately, so I withhold judgement for now, I would never recommend it (as I don't know it works), but I wouldn't suggest someone not use it if they believed it was doing them some good (- let's face it even if it is a placebo effect, then that can make a BIG difference, just look at the old 'knee surgery study done years ago now & are we claiming knee surgery is a fraud (the study where 50% of the patients got knee surgery & 50% got a deep cut so it looked like they had knee surgery - the results, more people who did NOT have surgery felt their knees were recovered than those that had knee surgery - the power of placebo, or maybe even the incision encouraged natural recovery in that region & fixed the knee as well, who knows?), so just because a study shows something it doesn't mean that the study is correct (hence it's called REsearch, it needs to be repeated many times, in many different ways to prove a thing is so).

At the moment I'll stay on the fence on this one until we get definitive proof of efficacy I think I'll stick to herbal remedies, massage, acupuncture etc as methods that have proven effectiveness as options for those suffering conditions.

Quote :
Homoeopathy sceptics plan mass 'overdose'

Protesters to swallow pills in bid to prove treatments ineffective

By Jeremy Laurance, Health Editor

In what is being billed as "rationalism's Kool-Aid moment", a mass "overdose" is being planned next week in protest at the marketing of homoeopathic medicines.

More than 300 people who style themselves as "homoeopathy sceptics" will each swallow an entire bottle of homoeopathic pills in protest at the continued marketing of homoeopathic medicines by Boots, the high street chemist chain.

The protest is due to take place at 10.23am on Saturday 30 January. It is organised by the "10.23 Group", who take their name from Avogadro's constant, which they claim proves that homoeopathy cannot work.

Avogadro's constant – roughly 10 to the 23rd power – places an upper limit, broadly speaking, on the number of molecules in a given volume of liquid or gas.

Successive dilutions used in the preparation of homoeopathic remedies reduce the amount of the original ingredient beyond this number, with the result that not a single molecule remains.

This has always been the sticking point for scientists who express bafflement at the notion that a homoeopathic "tincture", which contains not a single molecule of the active ingredient from which it was made, can have any effect.

In response, homoeopaths describe the process of repeatedly diluting and shaking a remedy as "potentisation", in which the influence of the active ingredient is transferred to the tincture. The water thus retains a "memory" of the substance.

In an open letter to Boots last November, the 10.23 Group wrote: "The majority of people do not have the time or inclination to check whether the scientific literature supports the claims of efficacy made by products such as homoeopathy. We trust brands such as Boots to check the facts for us, to provide sound medical advice that is in our interest, and supply only those products with a demonstrable medical benefit. We don't expect to find products on the shelf at our local pharmacy which do not work."

The letter also warned that the products could be dangerous if they led patients to delay seeking proper medical assistance because they believed homoeopathy could treat their condition.

There is a long tradition in science of researchers experimenting on themselves to prove a remedy works. But this will be the first time volunteers have swallowed pills to prove they don't.

If it turns out that there is something in them, then the guinea pigs may get their comeuppance. But they say their "overdose" will demonstrate that "these remedies, prepared according to a long-discredited 18th-century ritual, are nothing but sugar pills."

In England, an estimated 470,000 people use homoeopathic remedies every year. Branches of Boots carry shelves of remedies including arnica, nux vomica, pulsatilla and rhus tox in the "complementary medicine" section. The Queen, David Beckham and Geri Halliwell are among those said to swear by them.

The British Homeopathic Association claims that heightened public awareness of the dangers of chemicals in the food chain, growing resistance to antibiotics through over-use, and concerns about the side effects of conventional drugs, are contributing to a rethink about the way we live and how we seek to regain health.

Boots said in a statement: "We know that many people believe in the benefits of complementary medicines and we aim to offer the products we know our customers want.
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PostSubject: Re: Homoeopathy sceptics plan mass 'overdose'   Sun Jul 04, 2010 11:40 pm

Your summary is close enough. I studied homoeopathy as a mandatory part of my course (Naturopathy) and went into it with an open mind, as I always try to. I left with strong scepticism and after trying some remedies myself without any success, I decided I did not want to use them in my practice.

Whether or not it works is besides the point though, if people use commercially bought remedies. In homoeopathy, a single remedy should be used that is selected for the individual after a long case history taken by the homoeopath. However, remedies sold in health food shops and chemists/pharmacies usually have more than one ingredient and selected without proper case history. I feel that homoeopathy is effective approximately 20% of the time and this is due the placebo effect. Keep in mind though, that homoeopathy is used mostly in self-limiting conditions, where the condition will resolve on its own without any treatment.

As homoeopathic remedies are fairly cheap compared to some other treatments, they may be worth a try if the person "believes" in them, then this can elicit a placebo effect. But if you want proper homoeopathic medicine, then you need to see a qualified homoeopath. I have seen evidence against homoeopathy, but am yet to see any high-quality evidence that can show homoeopathy works.

I heard about the mass overdose, and feel the people are justified in their views if public funding is being used to pay for unproven medical treatment.
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PostSubject: Re: Homoeopathy sceptics plan mass 'overdose'   Mon Jul 05, 2010 1:40 am

This is pretty funny Laughing

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PostSubject: Re: Homoeopathy sceptics plan mass 'overdose'   Mon Jul 05, 2010 1:52 am

hahaha, I've seen that before, too be honest though, I got a bit defensive at first, since I am trained in homoeopathy, I kept saying, "that's not what its really like". haha
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