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 Going Raw, trying sprouting..help!

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porco_espinho

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PostSubject: Going Raw, trying sprouting..help!   Fri Jan 01, 2010 6:08 pm

Hi,
I am reading Brendan Brazier's book on vegan performance nutrition (Thrive) Thrive
and I am inspired to increase the raw component of my diet. Anyone out there who has tried going "raw" or sprouting? Thanks!

P.S. Does anyone know what's the best way to buy flax seed (i.e. roasted milled, Raw Whole, etc)
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Pete
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PostSubject: Re: Going Raw, trying sprouting..help!   Sat Jan 02, 2010 7:13 am

Flax is best bought whole then ground as you need it. I found getting a cheap coffee grinder the ideal solution you just bung in a tablespoon or 2, grind & use. Dead simple. Never heat flax (or any EFA [Essential Fatty acid]) the oils are damaged by heat, so only get raw, if you add to hot things like porridge add after heating. There are studies that show you can bake with cracked flax seeds (not oil) as the inside of the bun/loaf keeps the oil just below the point it goes rancid, but I don't think it's worth the bother when you can easily add flax to a shake or cereal or even gravy (again AFTER heating) & have like that. If you must use flax oil, then use as a salad topping or over pasta etc, never directly heat it & never, ever fry with it as you'll be eating carcinogens!

Pat Reeves has won powerlifting world records in 3 weight classes using 'living foods', which is like raw food only includes some bacteria foods added to stuff live (vegan) yoghurts & tempeh etc that she makes herself (or at least used to). It's probably best if you want to chat with her to go to her own thread here as she's never really got her head around how messageboards work & so waits for people to ask stuff on there (she is also on the VBB email list here).
I've not read thrive. I'm not really into the endurance type sports. I've worked with a few people who do it & people wanting general fitness, but I suppose my passion is strength rather than endurance, I really should read it. I read the book "raw power", but it's training & dietary goals just seemed wrong to me. It has been ages since I read it & I can't remember the details exactly. I remember one bit of training advice about Arlin & Wolfe (I think) passing a dumbbell back & forth while watching a film. That's the worst way to train to me. I believe in developing the mind/muscle connection, diverting the mind by watching TV is the wrong way to train in my view. You'd either focus on the TV & miss the maximum benefits of the weights (while still cutting into precious recovery) or you'd focus on the weights, then why bother with the TV? Just made no sense. The nutrition wasn't great either a huge reliance on super expensive 'super foods' people seem to forget that if no one grew carrots or broccoli they'd be classed as 'super foods' as much as any rare Amazonian flowering plant or herb for the Himalayas. It seemed like an advert for everything they sold rather than a serious training diet. In a real training diet whether you have say flax for a EFA source or hemp seeds doesn't matter so much, so whether you have maca or gogi berries isn't the determining factor in whether you make your lifts, it's an abundance of the nutrients you can get from everyday food you can buy anywhere, sure if you like any expensive 'super food' add them, but after the essentials. The essentials will give you 99% of what of what you need to reach your maximum potential, if you truly are elite (that is world class & competing at that level with that much focus) then maybe the adding of a rare super food will make a difference (shave that 0.0003 off your 100 metres for example), but for the most part if you are eating a wide range of whole foods, fresh fruit & veggies, then you'll be doing as much, if not more than 99% of the population that you are competing against.
I'm assuming you rate "Thrive" then? I'll have to check it out some time soon then.
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PostSubject: Re: Going Raw, trying sprouting..help!   Sat Jan 02, 2010 10:51 am

Pete,
Thanks! I will post my question on Pat's thread; also thanks for the advice on flax seed. I had no idea the toasted variety was so bad. I am glad I asked.

As to the book ("Thrive") it's good but beware that is also a bit of an advert of his "Thrive" diet and products endorsed by it. I filter out the promotional bits and focus on the good nutritional information parts of it. The main idea is that nutritional stress can be reduced by ingesting "one-step" nutrition food. I.e.:

Ingest food rich on enzymes(i.e. live food, sprouts) instead of having your body spend precious recovery energy doing it
Ingest simple carbs instead of ingesting complex carbs that the body needs to convert to simple ones
Ingest food rich in aminos (i.e. legume sprouts) instead of protein isolates that the body will have to convert to aminos

The main premise in my mind is to minimize the energy expenditure that the body has to go through to extract nourishment out of food, and then focus the energy surplus in training and recovery. Thus, gain more and better quality energy ingesting fewer calories. It reminded me a lot of the idea of focusing on energy conservation and distribution that the great Max Alding wrote about.
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PostSubject: Re: Going Raw, trying sprouting..help!   Sat Jan 02, 2010 3:26 pm

I've had a long running query about enzymes that not a single nutritionist or dietician has ever been able to explain. It's one I've only seen addressed by a book called the enzyme nutrition, but then they've had to make a leap that changes the very function of the stomach & then causes a whole new set of problems then then has to be explained. It's pretty easy to understand once you know a few things about how nutrients are assimilated & how the stomach functions:
1/ The stomach is basically a sack full of acid. Proteins hitting it are broken down into single amino acids or collections of 2 or occasionally 3 amino acids can also pass straight into the blood from the stomach pretty quickly - hence stuff like glutamine or other single amino acids, or creatine can pass pretty quickly from the stomach into the blood, they don't need to be broken down, just assimilated straight in (OK creatine needs a slight modification if you're not taking CEE which is designed to simulate a creatine in the form it's assimilated across the stomach lining, so there is less delay with that type....in theory. I'm not sure transit times have actually been tested). But basically the stomachs major function is destroying bond between amino acids, so they can assimilated.
2/ Enzymes are small proteins held together very weakly. Even cooking will destroy most enzymes.
3/ Prescribed enzymes (often called pancreatic enzymes), the enzymes the body itself uses to aid digestion are added in in the small intestine after any acid has been neutralised, they are given to you in an 'acid proof' capsule that dissolves in the presents of higher alkalinity - that is after the stomach. These enzymes would be destroyed in the stomach before they reached the safer conditions of the small intestine.

So how do food enzymes work? As far as I can tell not how most people seem to believe. If you eat say a raw fruit, you chew it to a pulp & swallow, then the food hits the stomach,. The theory appears to be that these enzymes in the fruit aid digestion (speed it up or make it happen more completely), but enzymes are weakly held together, just hitting the acid would break them up into their amino acids, that would happen well before even the protein in the fruit begins to break down, it would be pretty much on impact from what I can see (as heating even for a few seconds destroys all enzymes or even leaving standing for a while appears to lower enzymes dramatically), so enzymes will be destroyed on impact with anything as harsh as stomach acid. So how do they work? I've never had it explained in a realistic fashion. Most of the so called gurus who tout enzymes don't even bother to try & explain they just ignore queries about it (especially if they sell enzymes to 'aid digestion'). I'm not saying they don't work, I'd just like to know HOW they work, it'd be something you'd think everyone would want to know if they were taking stuff. I'm also not saying that there isn't something special about raw food not found in cooked food, but I'm not convinced it's necessarily the enzymes as I can't fathom a way that they work.
As I said there is one book that talks about one solution, that is that the stomach is actually 2 organs:
a/ at the top the stomach works as an 'enzyme stomach' (some creatures have a separate first stomach where food sits & is digested by the natural enzymes within it, then it moves on to the 'acid' stomach)
b/ The lower part of the stomach is an 'acid stomach'

But we run into problems as how do we keep food in the enzyme part of the stomach. The stomach churns & even if they only claim the bottom half churns, how do you stop the stuff above falling into the rest & getting mixed up? How do you stop the acid rising up? Different sections of the alimentary have valves (called sphincters) that stop food coming out of the stomach at the top, where the acids food leaves the stomach into the small intestine & the acid is neutralised we have another sphincter, but there is no way to keep the non-acidic food that has dropped into the lower section of the stomach away from the upper section. Problem 2 if there is no churning in the upper section then how do amino acids get into the blood so fast? If we take single amino acids there is a massive rise in the blood within minutes, so the amino acids are getting through the stomach wall fast (10-15 minutes), that is fast, if they are held without churning then how does so much amino acid get though so quickly? Thirdly you'd have to accept that over the last few centuries (since medical science actually started until today) every person studying the stomach has made a terrible mistake about how it works. You can get any anatomy book or go online & find texts about how the stomach works. Strangely we have got it right about many creatures having 'enzyme stomachs', but not about ourselves in many centuries of study. I've yet to find a satisfactory answer to these questions. I'm not saying it's not possible enzymes do a part, I could well be wrong in one or more aspect of my ideas, but I've yet to have it explained why? I think that maybe raw food does have some unique features that are very beneficial to humans, but I'm not convinced that it's actually the enzymes, so far I'm stuck with the idea that you're just getting a few extra amino acids (not a bad thing, but not the 'magic' that people claim for them). I think in the years to come we'll hopefully find out the secret of raw foods, it may be enzymes, but my money is on it being something else.

That, in a rather large nutshell, is my 'problem' with enzymes.
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